SFIA View: Process and governance

Process and governance

(modified)

Digital innovation

Change management

Governance

Demand management DEMM

(unchanged)

The analysis and proactive management of business demand for new services or modifications to existing service features or volumes. Collaborating with the business to prioritise demand in order to improve business value. Developing and communicating insights into patterns of demand. Proposing responses to meet both short-term and long-term demand and facilitating decision making and planning. Integrating demand analysis and planning with complementary strategic, operational and change planning processes.

Portfolio management POMG

(unchanged)

The development and application of a systematic management framework to define and deliver a portfolio of programmes, projects and/or ongoing services, in support of specific business strategies and objectives. Includes the implementation of a strategic investment appraisal and decision making process based on a clear understanding of cost, risk, inter-dependencies, and impact on existing business activities, enabling measurement and objective evaluation of potential changes and the benefits to be realised. The prioritisation of resource utilisation and changes to be implemented. The regular review of portfolios. The management of the service pipeline (proposed or in development), service catalogue (live or available for deployment) and retired services.

Programme management PGMG

(unchanged)

The identification, planning and coordination of a set of related projects within a programme of business change, to manage their interdependencies in support of specific business strategies and objectives. The maintenance of a strategic view over the set of projects, providing the framework for implementing business initiatives, or large-scale change, by conceiving, maintaining and communicating a vision of the outcome of the programme and associated benefits. (The vision, and the means of achieving it, may change as the programme progresses). Agreement of business requirements, and translation of requirements into operational plans. Determination, monitoring, and review of programme scope, costs, and schedule, programme resources, inter-dependencies and programme risk.

Project management PRMG

(unchanged)

The management of projects, typically (but not exclusively) involving the development and implementation of business processes to meet identified business needs, acquiring and utilising the necessary resources and skills, within agreed parameters of cost, timescales, and quality. The adoption and adaptation of project management methodologies based on the context of the project and selecting appropriately from predictive (plan-driven) approaches or adaptive (iterative/agile) approaches.

Portfolio, programme and project support PROF

(unchanged)

The provision of support and guidance on portfolio, programme and project management processes, procedures, tools and techniques. Support includes definition of portfolios, programmes, and projects; advice on the development, production and maintenance of business cases; time, resource, cost and exception plans, and the use of related software tools. Tracking and reporting of programme/project progress and performance are also covered, as is the capability to facilitate all aspects of portfolio/ programme/ project meetings, workshops and documentation.

Product management PROD

(unchanged)

The active management of products or services throughout their lifecycle (inception through to retirement) in order to address market opportunities and customer/user needs and generate the greatest possible value for the business. The adoption and adaptation of product development models based on the context of the work and selecting appropriately from predictive (plan-driven) approaches or adaptive (iterative/agile) approaches.

Business process improvement BPRE

(unchanged)

The creation of new and potentially disruptive approaches to performing business activities in order to create business opportunities; deliver new or improved products/services; or to improve supply chains. The identification and implementation of improvements to business operations, services and models. The assessment of the costs and potential benefits of the new approaches. The analysis and design of business processes in order to adopt and exploit technologies to improve business performance. The development of enterprise process management capabilities to increase organisational agility and responsiveness to change.

Business modelling BSMO

(modified)

The production of abstract or distilled representations of real world, business or gaming situations in traditional or trans-media applications, to aid the communication and understanding of existing, conceptual or proposed scenarios. Predominantly focused on the representation of processes, roles, data, organisation and time. Models may be used to represent a subject at varying levels of detail and decomposition.

Innovation INOV

(unchanged)

The capability to identify, prioritise, incubate and exploit opportunities provided by information, communication and digital technologies. To develop and implement processes, tools and infrastructures to support innovation. To involve internal and external communities, employees, commercial partners, customers, users and other stakeholders in the innovation process. To provide governance, monitoring to, and reporting on, the innovation process.

Emerging technology monitoring EMRG

(unchanged)

The identification of new and emerging technologies, products, services, methods and techniques. The assessment of their relevance and the potential impacts (both threats and opportunities) upon business enablers, cost, performance or sustainability. The communication of emerging technologies and their impact.

Enterprise and business architecture STPL

(unchanged)

The creation, iteration, and maintenance of structures such as enterprise and business architectures embodying the key principles, methods and models that describe the organisation's future state, and that enable its evolution. This typically involves the interpretation of business goals and drivers; the translation of business strategy and objectives into an “operating model”; the strategic assessment of current capabilities; the identification of required changes in capabilities; and the description of inter-relationships between people, organisation, service, process, data, information, technology and the external environment. The architecture development process supports the formation of the constraints, standards and guiding principles necessary to define, assure and govern the required evolution; this facilitates change in the organisation's structure, business processes, systems and infrastructure in order to achieve predictable transition to the intended state.

Business risk management BURM

(unchanged)

The planning and implementation of organisation-wide processes and procedures for the management of risk to the success or integrity of the business, especially those arising from the use of information technology, reduction or non-availability of energy supply or inappropriate disposal of materials, hardware or data.

Strategic planning ITSP

(unchanged)

The creation, iteration and maintenance of a strategy in order to align organisational actions, plans and resources with business objectives and the development of plans to drive forward and execute that strategy. Working with stakeholders to communicate and embed strategic management via objectives, accountabilities and monitoring of progress.

Enterprise IT governance GOVN

(unchanged)

The establishment and oversight of an organisation's approach to the use of Information systems and digital services, and associated technology, in line with the needs of the principal stakeholders of the organisation and overall organisational corporate governance requirements. The determination and accountability for evaluation of current and future needs; directing the planning for both supply and demand of these services; the quality, characteristics, and level of IT services; and for monitoring the conformance to obligations (including regulatory, legislation, control, and other standards) to ensure positive contribution of IT to the organisation's goals and objectives.

Measurement MEAS

(unchanged)

The development and operation of a measurement capability to support agreed organisational information needs. The planning, implementation, and control of activities to measure attributes of processes, products, and services in order to assess performance, progress, and provide indications and insights to actual or potential problems, issues, and risks. The identification of requirements, selecting measures and measurement scales, establishing data collection and analysis methods, setting target values and thresholds. Measurement can be applied to organizations, projects, processes, and work products.